TYPOGRAPHY

This & That: A Manifesto

This & That is a manifesto that questions the very nature of where design standards are in a new era of design built around the Internet and the proliferation of differing avenues of design.

It is a personal account of my understanding of current design standards and conflicting thoughts about how the Internet either empowers my generation to create and share, or it inhibits us from having a clear focus.

This project received a Merit award from the ISTD 2017 Student Assessment.

 

 

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This & That is an assemblage of feelings towards the current state of design standards. This personal collection examines the frustration and ambiguity that the upcoming generation of designers face with the advent of the Internet.

Design lacks focus because of how quickly ideas permeate and get lost in the bombardment of information.

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This & That is an assemblage of feelings towards the current state of design standards. This personal collection examines the frustration and ambiguity that the upcoming generation of designers face with the advent of the Internet.

The lack of focus in design liberates us from a status quo, empowering us to experiment and connect like never before.

CONTENT DEVELOPMENT

This & That, or That & This depending on where one starts, is a book that conflicts with itself. This spirals down from structured and established to sporadic and chaotic, implying that designers are not the creators with focus that they used to be and have allowed technology to take over too much of their thought processes. 

That begins where This left off and elevates the notion that technology allows designers to express themselves and share ideas like never before. 

I wanted to voice my opinion with two perspectives. Through rigorous revisions, I developed the headlines for This & That to be read from top to bottom or bottom to top and express different ideas with the same words.  

!content!content

DESIGN DIRECTION

Because This & That challenges the status quo of how the Internet is a tool for good, it seemed fitting to design the chaotic sections of each manifesto with a Dada sensibility. 

The rejection of the status quo and typographic rules to express my frustration and almost helplessness were why Dadaism was chosen a design direction. It provoked and questioned, which is what I believe This & That achieved.

The key piece of inspiration for my typographic characteristics was designer Kurt Schwitters. Particularly, his periodical, Merz, was an important piece that influenced my work.

!inspriation!inspriation

TYPOGRAPHY & COLOR

With Dada as the backbone, I chose the typefaces and colors to reflect the movement’s impassioned personality. Early 20th century typefaces were largely grotesque sans-serifs like Akzidenz Grotesk, News Gothic, and Franklin Gothic. I chose Franklin Gothic as the body typeface because of its high x-height and readability.

For the headlines and quotes, I used Balboa as it is also a grotesque sans-serif. Additionally, Balboa emulates qualities of wood type at larger sizes, which was used frequently in Dada pieces.

Dada art was bold, attention-grabbing, and expressed anger and frustration towards the status quo, regularly using orange as a highlight color. I incorporated this as well as the a warm light-gray in This & That. The gray originated from the paper color that was used in a lot of Dada type lockups.

I didn’t want my entire manifesto to be angry, so I complimented the orange with a dark, cool blue to bring stillness to the piece.

!type!type
!12!12
!123!123
!Blue!Blue
!Grey-blue!Grey-blue

BINDING

This and That, while separate, are bound together so that when one finishes reading, they continue onto the next section. This is used to illustrate the ambiguous and mirrored nature of the manifesto. 

When one reaches the "&" page of each book, all he or she needs to do is grab the spine of the next book and turn it like a page to begin again. This & That is saddle-stitched by hand to allow the pages to open flat so that one can read the content unobstructed.

BindingBinding

PAGINATION

The content of the book isn't supposed to be read page-by-page, but instead spread-by-spread. Each new spread has a different phrase to be said, building off of the one that came before it. The book utilizes horizontal rule lines to show importance and to gradually shift from static elements to become sharp, directional elements.

A stack of horizontal rules are used in the upper right-hand side of each spread to show one’s progression in each book.

In That, the rule lines imply that the reader is starting from the bottom going up, placing a greater emphasis on how the content is being read in reverse.

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